PART 2:
-Game Components
-Setup
-The Political Situation
-Order of Play

 

GAME COMPONENTS

 

Game Board and Storage Boxes

1 Sitrep The Day After… Game Board.

6 National power units

 

Game Charts/Aids

1 National Production Chart

1 Battle Board.

6 Set up charts

1 Allies Unit chart

1 Opfor Unit chart

 

Game Board

The game board is a map of the world, representing the day after the 9th September 2001.

 

National Production/Research & Development Chart

 

The national production part of this chart tracks each power’s production level (income) during the game. The level is based on the combined Industrial Production Credit (IPC) values of each territory a power controls. Place one of your control markers on the number on the chart that matches your power’s starting IPC total (as shown on your setup chart). This is the power’s starting national production level. Each player should keep track of his or her power’s production level separately.

 

The research & development part of this chart is used for an optional rule. If you’re playing the optional rule, whenever you develop a new technology, place one of your power’s control markers inside the appropriate advancement box on he chart.

 

Battle Strip, Casualty Strip, and Dice

  

The battle strip is a card with columns that list attacking and defending units and their combat strength. When combat occurs, the players involved place their units on both sides of the battle strip. Combat is resolved by rolling dice. Casualties are designated by being moved behind the casualty strip.

National Control Markers

National control markers indicate status in the game. They mark conquered territories and indicate national production levels. Take all of the national production markers that belong to your power.

 

Setup Charts

Take the setup chart for your power. It shows the name of the power, its units’ color, and

its emblem. It also lists the starting numbers and locations of that power’s units on the game board. Place all of the indicated units on the game board as listed.

 

 

Plastic Chips

 

Use the chips to save space in overcrowded territories and sea zones. White chips represent one combat unit each and red chips represent five units each. For example, if you wanted to place seven infantry on a space, you would stack up one red chip, one white chip, and one infantry unit on top. (If you don’t have enough pieces to top off all your stacks, simply use any identifying item, such as a piece of paper with the unit type written on it.) The number of stacks should not be limited by the number of plastic unit pieces available.)

 

Industrial Production Credits

 

Industrial Production Credits (IPC’s) are the money of the game, representing capacity for military production. The amounts shown in the chart below represents each power’s beginning national production level. Each power starts the game with that many IPCs.

During the game, each power will spend IPCs, on new units for example, and collect more IPCs as income from territories that it controls. Have one player act as a banker and track each power’s current IPC total on a piece of paper, or use another means agreed upon by your group.

 

Note: IPC income and IPC Level.

 

The IPC income of each power is determined by the state (Level) of war of the relevant power. A power receives no full IPC income at the start of the game.

 

Level 1 (Peacetime):

  • In de beginning… at the start of the game.
  • As stated, the United States is not at war with China, Russia (CIS) or the Arab League. The other three powers, China, Russia (CIS) and the Arab League, are not at war with the United Sates of America, United Kingdom or the NATO.
  • Each of the six powers receives 1/3rd (rounded up) of its total IPC income.

 

Level 2 (Escalation):

  • If a ‘Strict Neutral’ or a ‘Friendly Neutral’ territory is attacked.
  • An attack by either alliance on a strict neutral territory (whether successful or not) will result in all remaining strict neutrals adjacent countries (with a common connected border) becoming pro-Allies ore pro-Opfor, depending on which power violated the strict neutral’s neutrality.
  • In case of Escalation. The power which was attacked (not the power which made the combat movement, receives 2/3rd (rounded up) of its total IPC income in phase 7: Collect Income.

 

Level 3 (War):

  • If a power declares war on any of its opponents.
  • In case The War on Terror already escalated once, after a second ‘Escalation’.
  • In case a power declares war, the power which declares war (only), receives its total IPC income.

         By way of illustration; A power needs to declare          war to receive its total IPC          income.

  • In case The War on Terror already escalated once. After a second ‘Escalation’, the phase of war levels up from level 2 to level 3, resulting in a declaration of war by the power, which was attacked. As a result, the attacked or disadvantaged power is “provoked”. Therefor the power, on his turn, can declare war against its opponent(s). Other disadvantaged power(s) on their turn could declare war against opponent(s).
  • After, a power declares war on any of its opponents, this power receives his full IPC income in phase 7: Collect Income.

 

            (See also; Declaring War)

 

United States   green

Level 1: Income         16 IPC’s

Level 2: Income          31 IPC’s

Level 3: Income          46 IPC’s     

   

United Kingdom   Tan

Level 1: Income         3 IPC’s

Level 2: Income          6 IPC’s

Level 3: Income          9 IPC’s        

 

Arab League            black

Level 1: Income         6 IPC’s

Level 2: Income          11 IPC’s

Level 3: Income          16 IPC’s

 

NATO   Grey

Level 1: Income         19 IPC’s

Level 2: Income          38 IPC’s

Level 3: Income          57 IPC’s

 

China   Orange

Level 1: Income         10 IPC’s

Level 2: Income          20 IPC’s

Level 3: Income          30 IPC’s

        

Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS)   Brown

Level 1: Income         10 IPC’s

Level 2: Income          20 IPC’s

Level 3: Income          29 IPC’s

        

Spaces On The Game Board

 

Territories

 

The colors of the territories on the game board show which power controls them at the start of the game. Each power has its own color. All other spaces are neutral and are not aligned with any power.

 

Most territories have an income value ranging from 1 to 16.

This is the number of IPCs the territory produces each for its controller. A few territories, such as Gibraltar, have no income value.

 

Units can move between adjacent spaces (those that share a common border).

 

The game board “wraps around” horizontally. Territories and sea zones on the right edge of the board are adjacent to territories and sea zones on the left edge, as indicated by corresponding letters along the board edges

(A connects to A, B to B, and so on). The top and bottom edges of the board do not wrap around.

 

All territories exist in one of three conditions.

 

Friendly:        Controlled by you or a friendly power.

Hostile:          Controlled by an enemy power.

Neutral:         Not controlled by any power. Or controlled by a power on the other side with which you are not                                                yet at war.  Neutral territories (such as Mongolia) are light colored. They represent areas that are impassable for political or geographic reasons. You cannot attack neutral territories, move through them, or move over them with air units.  Violating neutrality is considered a hostile act (Combat Move)

 

Sea Zones

 

Sea zones are either friendly (contain friendly units) or hostile (contain enemy units). Friendly sea zones contain no surface warships (this doesn’t include submarines) belonging to a power with which you are at war. Hostile sea zones contain surface warships belonging to a power with which you are at war. (The presence of a surface warship belonging to an enemy power with which you are not yet at war doesn’t make a sea zone hostile).

 

Islands

 

An Island is a territory located entirely inside one sea zone. A group of labeled islands is considered one territory. It’s not possible to split up land-based units so that they are on different islands in the same group. The exception to this rule is separate islands with names located in the same sea zone. For example, The Bahamas and Bermuda are both located in the same sea zone 10. These islands can each have independent land-based units. Islands that have no name label, such as some of the islands in sea zone 13 and 14, are not game spaces and may not have units moved onto them.

 

 

Canals and Narrow Straits

 

Canals and narrow straits are geographic features that can help or hinder sea movement, depending upon who controls them. Canals are artificial waterways that connect two larger bodies of water, while narrow straits are natural passages that do the same. In either case, control of the land territories surrounding these features gives the controlling power and his allies the ability to travel through them while denying access to enemy powers.

 

There are two canals on the game board, artificial waterways that

connect two larger bodies of water. The Panama Canal connects

the Pacific Ocean (sea zone 20) to the Atlantic Ocean (sea zone 19),

while the Suez Canal connects the Mediterranean Sea (sea zone 15)

to the Indian Ocean (sea zone 34). A canal is not considered a space,

so it doesn’t block land movement. Land units can move freely within Egypt. Panama, containing the Panama Canal, is one territory, so no land movement is required to cross the canal within Panama.

 

There are three narrow straits on the game board. The Turkish Straits connect the Mediterranean and Black Sea (sea zone 16 to sea zones 14 en 15), the Strait of Gibraltar connects the Atlantic Ocean to the Mediterranean Sea (sea zones 12 and 13), and the Danish Straits connect the North and Baltic Seas (sea zones 6 and 5).

Narrow straits can’t be crossed by land units without the use of for example, transport ships. Turkey is an exception on this rule and count as one territory. So no land movement or transport ships are required to cross the straits within Turkey.

 

If your side (but not necessarily your power) controlled a canal or narrow strait at the start of your turn, you may move sea units through it (you can’t use it in the same turn that you capture it). If a canal or narrow strait is controlled by a power not on your side, but with which you are not yet at war, you must ask permission to use it, which may be denied. You can’t move sea units through a canal or narrow strait that is controlled by a neutral territory or by a power with which you are at war.

 

In order to control a canal or narrow strait, you must control its controlling land territory or territories. They are as follows:

Canal/Narrow Straits            Controlling Territories

Suez Canal                                   Egypt

Panama Canal                            Panama

Turkish Straits                           Turkey

Strait of Gibraltar                    Gibraltar

Danish Straits                            Denmark (Germany)

 

If there is only one controlling territory, the power that controls it controls the canal or strait. If there are two controlling territories, the side that controls both of them controls the canal or strait. If one side controls one territory and the other controls the other, the canal or strait is closed to sea units.

 

Submarines of any power may pass through the Canals and Narrow Straits regardless of which power controls it.

 

The movement of air units is completely unaffected by canals and straits, whether they are moving over land or sea. They can pass between sea zones connected by the canal or strait regardless of which side controls it.

 

SETUP

 

One or more players take the side of the Allies, and one or more players take the side of the Opfor. Each player controls one or more world powers. If a player controls more than one power, those powers must all be on the same side.

 

If you control more than one power, keep those powers’

income and units separate. You can conduct operations for only

one power at a time.

 

Once you have decided who will play which power(s), prepare the game for play.

 

THE POLITICAL SITUATION

 

It is the morning of September 12, 2001, the day after…

September 11, 2001. On that Tuesday morning, 19 terrorists from the Islamist militant group Al-Qaeda hijacked four passenger jets. The hijackers intentionally crashed two planes, American Airlines Flight 11 and United Airlines Flight 175 into the Twin Towers of the World Trade Center in New York City; both towers collapsed within two hours. Hijackers crashed American Airlines Flight 77 into the Pentagon in Arlington, Virginia. The fourth jet, United Airlines Flight 93, crashed into a field near Shanksville, Pennsylvania after passengers attempted to take control before it could reach the hijackers' intended target in Washington, D.C. Nearly 3,000 people died in the attacks.

The United States of America

The United States responded to the attacks of September 11, 2001 by launching the War on Terror. The United States however, is not at war with China, Russia (CIS) or the Arab League.

Optional: For a further optional game play you can choose to use the gamerules as described in the ruleset SITREP… The Day After… The War on Terror.

 

Operation Enduring Freedom – Afghanistan

On 20 September 2001, in the wake of the 11 September attacks, George W. Bush delivered an ultimatum to the Taliban government of Afghanistan to turn over Osama bin Laden and al-Qaeda leaders operating in the country or face attack. The Taliban demanded evidence of bin Laden's link to the 11 September attacks and, if such evidence warranted a trial, they offered to handle such a trial in an Islamic Court. The US refused to provide any evidence.

The War in Afghanistan, also called the Afghan war, began on October 7, 2001, as the armed forces of the United States of America, the United Kingdom, the Commonwealth of Australia, and the Afghan United Front (Northern Alliance) launched Operation Enduring Freedom. The primary driver of the invasion was the September 11 attacks on the United States, with the stated goal of dismantling the al-Qaeda terrorist organization and ending its use of Afghanistan as a base. The United States also said that it would remove the Taliban regime from power and create a viable democratic state. A decade into the war, the U.S. continues to battle a widespread Taliban insurgency, and the war has expanded into the tribal areas of neighbouring Pakistan.

 

Operation Iraqi Freedom - Iraq

On 20 March 2003, the Iraq War began with an air campaign, which was immediately followed by a U.S.-led ground invasion. The Bush administration stated the invasion was the "serious consequences" spoken of in the UNSC Resolution 1441. The Bush administration also stated the Iraq war was part of the War on Terror, something later questioned or contested.

 

Allies:

NATO, the United Kingdom.

 

Neutral to US:

ANZUS Australia, New Zealand, United States Security Treaty (ANZUS or ANZUS Treaty):

         Australia,

         New Zealand,

         United States.

“A Treaty signed September 1, 1951, whereby each of the parties recognizes that an armed attack in the Pacific Area on any of the Parties would be dangerous to its own peace and safety and declares that it would act to meet the common danger in accordance with its constitutional processes.”

 

Inter-American Treaty of Reciprocal Assistance (commonly known as the Rio Treaty, the Rio Pact:

         Argentina (Bolivia, Paraguay, Uruguay)

         Brazil

         Chili

         Colombia (Ecuador, Peru)

         Cuba

         Bahamas

         Dominican Republic (Haiti)

         Panama (Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua)

         Venezuela (Trinidad and Tobago)

         United States

“A treaty signed September 2, 1947, which provides that an armed attack against any American State shall be considered as an attack against all the American States and each one undertakes to assist in meeting the attack.”

 

Israel:(Ally),

         Israel

“Military relations between Israel and the United States have been consistently close.”

 

Japanese Treaty (Bilateral):

         Japan,

         United States.

“U.S. and Japan Mutual Defense Assistance Agreement.

A treaty signed January 19, 1960, whereby each party recognizes that an armed attack against either Party in the territories under the administration of Japan would be dangerous to its own peace and safety and declares that it would act to meet the common danger in accordance with its constitutional provisions and processes. The treaty replaced the security treaty signed September 8, 1951.”

 

Philippine Treaty (Bilateral):

         Philippines,

         United States.

“Philippine islands allies of the US Mutual Defense Treaty. A treaty signed August 30, 1951, by which the parties recognize that an armed attack in the Pacific Area on either of the Parties would be dangerous to its own peace and safety and each party agrees that it will act to meet the common dangers in accordance with its constitutional processes.”

 

Republic of Korea Treaty (Bilateral):

         South Korea,

         United States.

“The Republic of Korea and the United States agreed to a military alliance. A treaty signed October 1, 1953, whereby each party recognizes that an armed attack in the Pacific area on either of the Parties would be dangerous to its own peace and safety and that each Party would act to meet the common danger in accordance with its constitutional processes. (Alliance"the relationship forged in blood")”

 

NATO

Assist and support the United States of America.

NATO held an emergency meeting of the alliance's ambassadors in Brussels. The secretary general, Lord Robertson, promised the United States that it could rely on its allies in North America and Europe for assistance and support, and pledged that those responsible would not get away with it.

 

The NATO council declared the attacks on the United States were an attack on all NATO nations which satisfied Article 5 of the NATO charter. This marked the first invocation of Article 5, which had been written during the Cold War with an attack by the Soviet Union in mind. Australian Prime Minister John Howard invoked Article IV of the ANZUS treaty. The Bush administration announced a War on Terror, with the stated goals of bringing bin Laden and al-Qaeda to justice and preventing the emergence of other terrorist networks. These goals would be accomplished by imposing economic and military sanctions against states perceived as harbouring terrorists, and increasing global surveillance and intelligence sharing.

 

Allies:

NATO (OTAN):

         Benelux          (Belgium, Luxembourg, Netherlands)

                           Netherlands Antilles

         Central Canada (Saint Pierre and Miquelon)

         Canada East

         Canada West

         Germany (Denmark)

                           Greenland

         France (Andorra, Corsica, Monaco)

                           French Polynesia

                           French Guiana (Guyana, Suriname)

                           Kerguelen

                           New Amsterdam and St. Paul

                           New Caledonia

                           Réunion

                           Saint Martin (Guadeloupe, Martinique, Saint-Barthélemy)

                           Wallis and Futuna

         Greece

         The United Kingdom

         Hungary

         Iceland

                           Faroe Islands

         Italy (San Marino, Sardinia, Sicily)

         Norway

         Poland

         Portugal

                  Azores

                  Madeira

         Spain (Andorra, Mallorca)

                  Canary Islands

         Czech Republic 'Czech Republic'

         Turkey

         United States

 

         Date 29 March 2004:

         Bulgaria

         Estonia

         Latvia

         Lithuania

         Romania

         Slovakia

         Slovenia

 

         Date 1 April 2009:

         Albania

         Croatia

“Also called the North Atlantic Alliance, is an intergovernmental military alliance based on the North Atlantic Treaty which was signed on 4 April 1949. The organization constitutes a system of collective defence whereby its member states agree to mutual defence in response to an attack by any external party.”

 

United Kingdom

The United Kingdom, Australia and New Zealand (ANZUS = United States, Australia and New Zealand) Assist and support the United States of America.

United Kingdom: British security forces across the world were placed on maximum alert. Prime Minister Tony Blair pledged that Britain would stand "full square alongside the U.S." in the battle against terrorism. Queen Elizabeth expressed "growing disbelief and total shock." In London, the US national anthem was played at the Changing of the Guard at Buckingham Palace, and traffic on The Mall came to a halt during the tribute.

 

Australia: Australian Prime Minister John Howard was in Washington D.C on the morning of the attacks and invoked the ANZUS Treaty, saying it demonstrated "Australia's steadfast commitment to work with the United States.”

 

New Zealand: New Zealand Prime Minister Helen Clark stated "It's the sort of thing the worst movie scenario wouldn't dream up," and a New Zealand Herald DigiPoll revealed that after the attacks 2/3 of New Zealanders supported a NZ pledge of troops to Afghanistan.

 

Allies:

            NATO

            United States of America

 

Neutral to UK:

Five Power Defence Arrangements (FPDA):

         Northern Australia (Norfolk)

         Western Australia (Ashmore Cartier)

         South Australia

                  Christmas Island

                  Cocos Islands

                  Kiribati (Nauru, Tokelau)

         Malaysia

         New Zealand

                  Cook Islands

                  niue

                  Western Samoa

         Singapore

         United Kingdom of Great Britain

“The Five Power Defence Arrangements (FPDA) are a series of defence relationships established by a series of multi-lateral agreements between the United Kingdom, Australia, New Zealand, Malaysia and Singapore (all Commonwealth members) signed in 1971, whereby the five powers are to consult each other "immediately" in the event or threat of an armed attack on Malaysia or Singapore for the purpose of deciding what measures should be taken jointly or separately in response.”

 

China

China is not at war.

Chinese President Jiang Zemin said he was "shocked" and sent his condolences to President Bush, while the Foreign Ministry said China "opposed all manner" of terrorism.

 

The initial reaction from the Chinese leadership to the sight of packed airplanes smashing into the twin towers of the World Trade Center was shock, expressed in a letter from president Jiang Zemin to his counterpart, George W. Bush (United States). After that subsided, it was replaced by concern that an angry United States would lash out militarily against Afghanistan and Pakistan, causing instability along China’s sensitive southwestern border.

 

It took only a little longer for Beijing to realize that America’s fury – and Mr. Bush’s decision to devote much of his country’s military and economic might to his project of reshaping the Middle East – presented an enormous opportunity for a budding superpower looking to take its place on the world stage.

 

Allies:

         -

 

Neutral to China:

Shanghai Cooperation Organisation or (SCO):

         China

         Kazakhstan

         Uzbekistan (Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan)

         Russia

“The Shanghai Cooperation Organization (SCO), or Shanghai Pact,[1] is a Eurasian political, economic, and military organisation which was founded in 2001 in Shanghai by the leaders of China, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Russia, Tajikistan, and Uzbekistan. These countries, except for Uzbekistan had been members of the Shanghai Five, founded in 1996; after the inclusion of Uzbekistan in 2001, the members renamed the organisation. On July 10, 2015, the SCO decided to admit India and Pakistan as full members.”

 

North Korean Mutual Aid and Cooperation Friendship Treaty:

         North Korea

“The treaty was signed in Beijing and came into effect on September 10 of the same year. Premier of the People's Republic of China Zhou Enlai and President of North Korea Kim Il-sung signed for their respective countries. The treaty generally promoted peaceful cooperation in the areas of culture, economics, technology and other social benefits between the two nations. Specifically, Article 2 of the treaty declares the two nations guarantee to adopt immediately all necessary measures to oppose any country or coalition of countries that might attack either nation.”

 

Russia Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS)

Russia is not at war.

Russia put troops on alert. President Vladimir Putin held an emergency meeting of security officials and said he supported a tough response to these "barbaric acts". He also informed Condoleezza Rice (United States) by telephone that any and all pre-existing hostility between the two countries would be put aside while America dealt with the tragedy.

 

Allies:

Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS):

         Georgia (Armenia, Azerbaijan)

         Kazakhstan

         Moldova 'Md'

         Uzbekistan (Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan)

         Belarus

         Russia

“Also called the Russian Commonwealth (to distinguish it from the British Commonwealth of Nations[3]), is a regional organization formed during the dissolution of the Soviet Union. Nine out of the 15 former Soviet Republics are member states, and two are associate members (Ukraine and Turkmenistan). Georgia withdrew its membership in 2008, while the Baltic states (Estonia, Lithuania and Latvia) chose not to participate.”

 

Shanghai Cooperation Organisation or (SCO):

         China

         Kazakhstan

         Uzbekistan (Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan)

         Russia

“The Shanghai Cooperation Organization (SCO), or Shanghai Pact, is a Eurasian political, economic, and military organisation which was founded in 2001 in Shanghai by the leaders of China, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Russia, Tajikistan, and Uzbekistan. These countries, except for Uzbekistan had been members of the Shanghai Five, founded in 1996; after the inclusion of Uzbekistan in 2001, the members renamed the organisation. On July 10, 2015, the SCO decided to admit India and Pakistan as full members.”

 

Neutral to CIS:

As a result of Appointments:

         Ukraine

         Turkmenistan

 

Arab League

Arab League is not at war.

The Islamic world. Most Muslim political and religious leaders condemned the attacks. The leaders vehemently denouncing the attacks included the Presidents of Egypt, Jordan, the Palestinian Authority, Libya, Syria, Iran and Pakistan.

The sole exception was Iraq, when the then-president Saddam Hussein, said of the attacks that "the American cowboys are reaping the fruit of their crimes against humanity". Saddam would later offer sympathy to the Americans killed in the attacks.

 

Arab League:

“Is a regional organization of Arab countries in and around North Africa, the Horn of Africa and Arabia. It was formed in Cairo on 22 March 1945 with six members: Kingdom of Egypt, Kingdom of Iraq, Transjordan (renamed Jordan in 1949), Lebanon, Saudi Arabia, and Syria. Yemen joined as a member on 5 May 1945. Currently, the League has 22 members, but Syria's participation has been suspended since November 2011, as a consequence of government repression during the Syrian Civil War.”

 

Neutral Territories

In 2001, the so-called War on Terror had begun and a truly and possible global war was about tot begin.

Many neutral countries (neutrals) were forced to join one side or the other.

 

There are three types of neutral territories in this game: pro-Allies, pro-Opfor, and strict neutral (non aligned).

 

Pro-Allies:

- Neutral to the United States. (ANZUS, Mutual Defence Treaties, Pacts, Alliances and agreements)

- Neutral to the United Kingdom. (Five Power Defence Arrangements)

- Neutral to the NATO. (European Union)

 

Pro-Opfor:

- Neutral to China. (Shanghai Cooperation Organisation)

- Neutral to Russia. (Shanghai Cooperation Organisation)

- Neutral to Russia (CIS). (agreements)

 

Strict Neutral:

- Neutral Africa.

- Neutral Asia.

- Neutral Balkan.

- Neutral Caribbean.

- Neutral Europe.

- Neutral Pacific Ocean.

- Neutral Indian Ocean.

- Neutral North America

 

Many neutrals have their own standing army, navy and or air force. These units will be places on the map if and when the neutrality is compromised. These units are placed free of charge.

 

Friendly Neutrals (Neutral to…)

Friendly neutrals are neutral territories that are sympathetic to your alliance. For example, on the map Israel is pro-Allies (neutral to the United States). This territory would be a friendly neutral to the United States.

Ireland is pro-Allies (neutral to the NATO). This territory would be a friendly neutral to the NATO and therefore also to the United States and the United Kingdom (The United States and the United Kingdom both are NATO members).  

Australia is pro-Allies (neutral to the United States in connection with ANZUS and neutral to the United Kingdom in connection with FPDA). This territory would be a friendly neutral to the United States and the United Kingdom, but not to NATO.  

North-Korea is pro-Opfor (neutral to China) This territory would be a friendly neutral to China, but not to the Commonwealth Of Independent States.

Kazakhstan is pro-Opfor (neutral to China and the Commonwealth Of Independent States in connection with SCO). This territory would be a friendly neutral to China, and to the Commonwealth Of Independent States. China and Russia both are members of the Shanghai Cooperation or (SCO).

 

Friendly neutrals may not be attacked, and (opposing) air units may not fly over them. Unfriendly movement into a friendly neutral is considered a combat move and any combat must be resolved during the conduct combat phase (Moving into unfriendly Neutrals). Pro-‘Friendly’ units can be moved into (but not through) as a noncombat move by units of a power that is at war. This ‘moving through’ moves the territory out of its neutral status, however. The first friendly power to do so places its national control marker on the former friendly neutral territory, and its national production level is adjusted upward by the value of the territory. With the territory’s loss of neutrality in this way, its standing army, navy and or air force is immediately activated. The units placed belong to the power that now controls the formerly neutral territory, and may be used freely beginning on that power’s next turn.

 

Unfriendly Neutrals

Neutrals that are friendly to the side opposing your side are said to be unfriendly neutrals. For example Egypt will have to fight its way into Israel, which is a pro-Allies neutral state.

 

Moving into an unfriendly neutral is considered a combat move and any combat must be resolved during the conduct combat phase. Before the neutral territory can be occupied (taken control of) by the invading power, all of the neutral’s standing army units must be eliminated. Air units can’t fly over an unfriendly neutral unless they are attacking it.

 

When a neutral territory is invaded, its standing army, navy and or air force units are immediately placed in it. Use any nationality’s units to represent this neutral force. In each case, appoint one of the players on the opposite side to control the neutral’s units. This player places the neutral units on the board and manages them when they conduct combat. Don’t mix or confuse the neutral units with the units of another power, including the power managing the neutral’s pieces on the board.

 

Capturing an unfriendly neutral gives the capturing player the IPC income of the territory. The invading power places its national control marker on the territory, and its national production level is adjusted upward by the value of the captured territory.

 

If the attack upon the neutral territory is unsuccessful (the territory is not captured), it’s no longer considered neutral and becomes part of the alliance opposing the power that attacked it. For example, if Egypt attacked Israel but failed to capture it, after the attack Israel would join the Allies (In this case, Israel would join the United States). Any remaining defending units stay in the territory, but can’t move. The territory remains uncontrolled, but units from the side it’s now allied with can move into it and take control of it and its remaining units in the same way as if it were a friendly neutral.

 

Strict Neutrals

Iran and India are examples of strict neutrals. They have no particular leaning toward one side or the other. These neutrals can only be controlled by invading them. Strict neutrals are treated exactly the same way as unfriendly neutrals, with one exception. An attack by either alliance on a strict neutral territory (whether successful or not) will result in all remaining strict neutrals adjacent countries (with a common connected border) becoming pro-Allies ore pro-Opfor, depending on who violated the strict neutral’s neutrality. For example, If the United states attacks Iran, all the strict neutrals neighbours (with a common connected border) on the map would take on a pro-Opfor status for all purposes.

This would mean, Afghanistan and Pakistan would both become pro-Opfor.

 

In addition: The same applies to islands and territories, sharing the same sea zone. For example; India, the Maldives and Sri Lanka.

 

Once any formerly neutral territory becomes controlled by a major power, the rules regarding neutral territories no longer apply to it. It’s treated like any other territory, with the exception that it has no “original” controller (even if it was initially biased toward one side or the other). In other words, it may only be captured, and never liberated.

 

Declaring War (Peacetime, Escalation and War)

 

“A declaration of war is a formal act by which one state goes to war against another. The declaration is a performative speech act (or the signing of a document) by an authorized party of a national government, in order to create a state of war between two or more states.”

 

If there are no restrictions currently keeping you from being at war with a power on the other side (see “The Political Situation,” SITREP... The Day After...), you may declare war on that power. War must be declared on your turn at the beginning of the Combat Move phase, before any combat movements are made, unless otherwise specified in the political rules. An actual attack is not required. Once a state of war is entered into, all territories and sea zones controlled by or containing units belonging to

the power or powers on which you declared war instantly become hostile to your units, and the normal restrictions of moving into or through hostile spaces apply, with one exception. During your Combat Move phase in which you entered into a state of war, your amphibious assault ships that are already in sea zones that have just become hostile may be loaded in those sea zones (but not in other hostile sea zones). In effect, amphibious assault ships may be loaded in their initial sea zones for amphibious assaults before war is declared, while the sea zone is still friendly.

Declarations of war are either “provoked” or “unprovoked.” A declaration of war is considered to be provoked either when the declaration is made in reaction to the direct aggression of another power or when a political rule allows the power to declare war due to a specific action being taken by another power. For example, if the United Kingdom declares war on China, a subsequent declaration of war by China on the United Kingdom (which is technically unnecessary, as the two powers are already at war) would be considered provoked. Both powers, the United Kingdom and China, however needs to declare war to receive their total IPC income.

 

Level 1 (Peacetime):

  • In de beginning… at the start of the game.
  • As stated, the United States is not at war with China, Russia (CIS) or the Arab League. The other three powers, China, Russia (CIS) and the Arab League, are not at war with the United Sates of America, United Kingdom or the NATO.
  • Each of the six powers receives 1/3rd (rounded up) of its total IPC income.

 

Level 2 (Escalation):

  • If a ‘Strict Neutral’ or a ‘Friendly Neutral’ territory is attacked.
  • An attack by either alliance on a strict neutral territory (whether successful or not) will result in all remaining strict neutrals adjacent countries (with a common connected border) becoming pro-Allies ore pro-Opfor, depending on which power violated the strict neutral’s neutrality.
  • In case of Escalation. The (Friendly to) power which was attacked (not the power which made the combat movement, receives 2/3rd (rounded up) of its total IPC income in phase 7: Collect Income.

         (I.e.: If NATO make a combat move into Ukraine which is Neutral Friendly to CIS,

         After the attack, it would make both the strict neutral territory Romania and          Slovakia friendly neutral to CIS. Because of this fact, the situation Escalates and          CIS receives 2/3rd of its total IPC income in phase 7: Collect Income.)

 

Level 3 (War):

  • If a power declares war on any of its opponents.
  • In case The War on Terror already escalated once, after a second ‘Escalation’.
  • In case a power declares war, the power which declares war (only), receives its total IPC income.

         By way of illustration; A power needs to declare          war to receive its total IPC          income.

  • In case The War on Terror already escalated once. After a second ‘Escalation’, the phase of war levels up from level 2 to level 3, resulting in a declaration of war by the power, which was attacked. As a result, the attacked or disadvantaged power is “provoked”. Therefor the power, on his turn, can declare war against its opponent(s). Other disadvantaged power(s) on their turn could declare war against opponent(s).
  • After, a power declares war on any of its opponents, this power receives his full IPC income in phase 7: Collect Income.

 

            (See also; Industrial Production Credits)

 

ORDER OF PLAY

 

Sitrep The Day After… is played in rounds. One round consists of each power taking a turn.

One round in the game is equivalent to a period of three months (91,25 days) in Real-Time.

1st quarter of a year:                  January, February, march

2nd quarter of a year:          April, may, juni

3rd quarter of a year:          July, august, September

4th quarter of a year:          October, November, December

 

The order that players take turns depends on the scenario; this scenario starts in the 3rd quarter of the year 2001.

 

In this scenario… After the attacks of September 11, 2001, the United States of America launched the War on Terror.

 

First Round – All Players: Especially because of the fact that, during the moment and time the events of 9/11 took place, the exact locations of the most units were unknown, an adjustment to the first round of play had to be made. The Turn Sequence of the first round of the game exists for that reason solely of performing Phase 1, 2, 5, 6 and 7. In the first round of play, we skip Phase 3 and 4. In the first Turn, there is no Combat Move or Conduct Combat.

 

  1. United States
  2. United Kingdom
  3. Arab League
  1. NATO 
  1. Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS)
  2.  China

 

At the end of the China player’s turn, check for victory. If neither side has won, begin a new round play.

Your power’s turn consists of seven phases, which take place in a fixed sequence. You must collect income if you can, but all other parts of the turn sequence are voluntary. When you finish the collect income phase, your turn is over. Play then passes to the next power. When every power has completed a turn, if no side has won, begin a new round of play.        

 

Turn Sequence

 

Phase 1:          Research & Develop Weapons

Phase 2:          Purchase & Repair Units

Phase 3:          Combat Move

                             Special Combat Movement

Phase 4:          Conduct Combat

                             Strategic Bombing Raids

                             Amphibious Assaults

                            General Combat

                            Multinational Forces

Phase 5:          Non Combat Move

Phase 6:          Mobilize New Units

Phase 7:          Collect Income

 

Phase 1: Diplomacy, Research & Develop Weapons

 

Note: This is an optional rule—players should decide whether or not this phase will be included in their game.

 

Diplomacy

 

In this phase, you may attempt to develop diplomatic relations. To do so, you buy ambassadors that give you a chance for a diplomatic breakthrough. Each ambassador/diplomacy token will grant you one die that provides a chance for a diplomatic breakthrough.

 

Diplomacy Sequence

  1. Buy diplomacy tokens
  2. Roll diplomacy dice
  3. Mark diplomatic breakthrough

 

Step 1: Buy Diplomacy Tokens

Each diplomacy token costs 5 IPCs. Buy as many as you wish, including none.

Choose one or more Strict Neutral territories that you want to change in to a Friendly Neutral territory.

 

Step 2: Roll Diplomacy Dice

For each diplomacy token you have, roll one die.

Success: If you roll at least one “6,” you have successfully made a diplomatic breakthrough. Discard all your diplomacy token and continue to step 3.

Failure: If you do not roll a “6,” your ambassador has failed. Depose all your diplomacy tokens and continue to the Purchase Units phase of the turn.

 

Step 3: Mark Diplomatic Breakthrough

If you rolled a “6” on any diplomacy die, choose one of the Strict Neutral territories and make an ‘aid package’ (Number of IPC’s, equal to one and a half (rounded up) the Neutral territories value, must be paid to the bank).

Once the Strict Neutral territory is choosen and the ‘aid package’ is paid to the bank. The related territory now becomes a Friendly Neutral territory to the current power.

A neutral to… marker is places in the former Neutral territory. The former Strict Neutral territory now is treated as a Friendly neutral territory. The diplomatic breakthrough becomes effective immediately.

 

Research & Develop Weapons

 

In this phase, you may attempt to develop improved military technology. To do so, you buy researchers that give you a chance for a scientific breakthrough. Each researcher token will grant you one die that provides a chance for a breakthrough.

Research & Development Sequence

  1. Buy researcher tokens
  2. Roll research dice
  3. Roll breakthrough die
  4. Mark developments

 

Step 1: Buy Researcher Tokens

Each researcher token costs 5 IPCs. Buy as many as you wish, including none.

 

Step 2: Roll Research Dice

For each researcher you have, roll one die.

Success: If you roll at least one “6,” you have successfully made a technological breakthrough. Discard all your researcher tokens and continue to step 3.

Failure: If you do not roll a “6,” your research has failed. Depose all your used researcher tokens and continue to the Purchase Units phase of the turn.

 

Step 3: Roll Breakthrough Die

If you rolled a “6” on any research die, choose one of the breakthrough charts (below) and roll a die to see which technological advance you get. You can only receive one advance each turn. If you have already received the same result on a previous turn, reroll until you get a new technological advance. Once you have received all the advances on a chart, you cannot gain any more advances from that chart.

 

If the breakthrough charts contains levels instead of options (sitrep), after a rolled “6”, you receive a level up at the chosen breaktrough chart.

 

BREAKTHROUGH CHART I – ARMY

  1. Advanced Artillery. Each of your artillery units can now provide greater support. One artillery unit can support two infantry per attack.

Two infantry when coupled with one artillery unit each have an attack value of 2.

  1. AA guns vs Armor (SITREP). Anti Aircraft Guns can be used against attacking armored vehicles (APC, Tanks). Whenever an armored vehicle unit enters a territory containing an enemy antiaircraft gun, the antiaircraft gun fires during the opening fire step of combat. Roll one die for each attacking armored vehicle unit (but only one antiaircraft gun in a territory can fire, even if they are controlled by different powers). For every roll of 1, one attacking armored vehicle unit is destroyed.

The defender determine in advance, if he uses the Anti Aircraft Gun against attacking vehicles, or that it is being used against attacking air units.

  1. Long Range Artillery (SITREP). Each bunker complex unit can conduct one (1) attack against enemy units during the opening fire step, against units in a territory or sea zone within a range of one (1) space, ending its combat movement (the enemy units do not fire back).

Territories or sea zones, involved in this attack, may still be attacked during the Combat Sequence.

  1. Heavy Artillery (SITREP). Artillery units can conduct two (2) rounds of fire against enemy units during the first round of combat (Combat Sequence, Attacking units fire).

This option is not compatible with the Long Range Artillery option.

  1. Advanced Tanks (SITREP). Attacking tanks. For every dice attack roll of a 1, the attacker scores a direct hit. On a roll of “1,” that unit is destroyed and immediately removed from the game.
  2. Heavy Tanks (SITREP). Attacking tanks. If at least 4 of your tanks (from the same power) make an offensive move to the same territory, two out of four attack with 4. They may come from different land territory, but they have to attack the same territory.

In addition: If one out of four tanks is destroyed, only one surviving tank is capable to attack with a 4 or less. If two out of four tanks are destroyed, no surviving tank is capable to attack with a 4 or less.

 

BREAKTHROUGH CHART II – NAVY

  1. Advanced Submarines. The attack value of your submarines is now 3 instead of 2. The defense value of your submarines remains at 1.
  2. Long Range Submarines (SITREP). Submarines can move 3 spaces. They are allowed to make a special movement under the North Pole as follows: Under the ice, they are allowed to sail from the sea area, Northwest of Russia to the sea area which is situated northeast of Russia (or vice versa)
  3. ‘Cloak of Silence´ Silent Submarines (SITREP).

Silent submarines. Unless the submarines attack, frigates cannot detect the submarines (negates the effect of a Frigate unit).

  1. Advanced Air Defense (SITREP). Naval Air Defense. It follows the rules of an antiaircraft gun.

One Destroyer, one Frigate, one Cruiser and/or one Carrier in a sea zone can fire, even if they are controlled by different powers.

Unit:                                                     Anti-Air:

Amphibious Assault Ship         -

Frigate                                                1

Destroyer                                       -2

Cruiser                                               1

Carrier                                               1

  1. Advanced Radar (SITREP). Increases the defense value of any carrier and air base based fighter with a defense factor of plus one (+1).

In addition: It neutralizes the stealth characteristics of an attacker.

  1. Improved Shipyards. Your sea units are now cheaper to build. Use these revised costs:

Submarines, and Amphibius landing ships cost         1 IPC less.

Frigates and Destroyers cost                                               2 IPC less.

Cruisers and Air-craft Carriers cost                                3 IPC less.

 

BREAKTHROUGH CHART III – AIR FORCE

  1. AWAC. Your antiaircraft gun fire now hits on a 1 or 2 instead of

just a 1.

  1. Aerial refueling Long-Range Aircraft (SITREP). Increases the move value of any fighter and/or helicopter with a move factor of plus one (+2). A bomber (transportplane) with a move factor of plus two (+4).
  2. Precision Airstrike (SITREP).

Attacking Fighters and Bombers are capable to conduct a precision airstrike.

In addition: For every dice roll of a 1 and/or 2, the defending unit is hit, the attacker may choose the target.

For every dice roll of a 1, the defending unit is destroyed immediately (the enemy units do not fire back).

Only one fighter and/or one bomber can fire once in a battle, no matter how many are in the territory (and even if the others are controlled by different powers).

Precision Airstrike must be declared before every first round of combat and before the attacking units fire.

  1. Stealth Technology (SITREP). Attacking Fighters and Bombers are capable to conduct a Stealt-attack (invisible to radar and air defense).

Only one fighter and/or one bomber can be designated per turn, no matter how many are in the territory (and even if the others are controlled by different powers).

Stealth-attack must be declared before every first round of combat and before the attacking units fire.

For every hit, the defending unit is destroyed immediately (the enemy units do not fire back).

  1. Fighter bombers. (SITREP) Fighters can conduct a strategic bombing raid (see strategic bomber).
  2. Heavy Bombers. Your bombers are now heavy bombers. You roll two dice for each bomber when you attack or make a strategic bombing raid. On defense, your bombers still roll only a single die.                                      

 

BREAKTHROUGH CHART IV – MISSILE & NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGY

Level 1. -Tactical ballistic Missiles.

E.g. –‘Scud’ Missile (SITREP)

Strategic Bombing Raid and Air Defense.

Range:               1 space.

Platform:         Antiaircraft gun (grey).

Level 2: -Class I Missiles (White)

E.g. -GLBM (Ground-launched Cruise Missile) (SITREP).                 

Missiles can carry either a conventional or a chemical warhead.

Range:                 1 space.

Platform:            Antiaircraft gun (grey), MLRS.

Level 3: -Class II Missiles (Grey)

E.g. -ALCM (Air-launched Cruise Missile) (SITREP).

Missiles can carry either a a conventional, chemical or a nuclear warhead.

Range:                  2 space.

Platform:            Surface naval vessel, Bomber.

Level 4: -Class III Missile (black)

E.g. -SLBM (submarine-launched Ballistic Missile) (SITREP).

Missiles can carry either a conventional, chemical or a nuclear warhead.

Range:                  6 space.

Platform:            Submarine, Silo, (MLRS only by Opfor).

Level 5: -Class IV Missile (red)

E.g. -ICBM (Intercontinental Ballistic Missile (SITREP).

Missiles can carry either a conventional, chemical or a nuclear warhead.

Range:                9 space.

Platform:          Silo.

 

Phase 2: Purchase & Repair Units

 

In this phase, you may spend IPCs for additional units to be used in future turns. All the units listed on your power’s setup card are available for purchase.

 

Purchase units Sequence

  1. Order units
  2. Pay for units & repair damaged units and facilities
  3. Place units in mobilization zone

 

Step 1: Order units

You may buy as many units of any type as you can afford. Select all the units you wish to buy. You do not have to spend all of your IPCs. But keep in mind. IPCs All which are not spent, are Considered lost at end of a players turn.

 

Step 2: Pay for units & Repair damaged units and facilities

Pay IPCs to the bank equal to the total cost of the units (by having the banker adjust your IPC totals). You do not have to spend all of your IPCs.

You can also pay to remove damage from facilities. Facilities are industrial complexes, airbases, and naval bases. Each point of damage costs 1 IPC to remove. Repairs take effect immediately, and the controlling player can use repaired facilities during the rest of this turn.

Your capital ships, carriers, and cruisers in sea zones serviced by operative friendly naval bases (including those repaired in this turn) are also repaired at this time. There is no IPC cost to repair these ships.

 

Step 3: Place units in the Mobilization Zone

Place the purchased units in the mobilization zone (on the game board). You cannot use these units right away, but you will deploy them later in the turn.

 

Phase 3: Combat Move (Powers at War Only)

 

Movement in this game is separated into combat movement and noncombat movement phases. During the Combat Move phase, all movement must result in combat, with a few exceptions (see below). Movement into a hostile territory counts as a combat movement whether that space is occupied or not. Additional movement that does not result in combat occurs during the Noncombat Move phase (phase 4).

 

Move as many of your units into as many hostile territories and sea zones as you wish. You can move into a single hostile space from different spaces, as long as each moving unit can reach that space with a legal move.

 

You can move units through friendly spaces en route to hostile spaces during this phase. However, units cannot end their movement in friendly spaces during the Combat Move phase except in four instances:

 

-Tanks and mechanized infantry that have blitzed through an unoccupied hostile space (see Tanks, Mechanized Infantry and Blitzing),

-Sea units that will be participating in an amphibious assault from an uncontested sea zone,

-Sea units moving from a hostile sea zone to escape combat as their combat move, and

- Sea units moving into a sea zone containing only enemy submarines in order to attack those units. (Remember that such a sea zone is not considered hostile.)

 

If you move all of your units out of a territory you control, you still retain control of that territory until an enemy moves into and capture it (the territory remains in control of the power that controlled it at the start of the turn).

 

Units from the same side can freely share territories, sea zones, and space on aircraft carriers and amphibious assault ships with one another. These shared events must be agreed upon by both powers.

 

All combat movement is considered to take place at the same time: Thus, you cannot move a unit, then conduct combat, then move that unit again during this phase. The only exception to this is land units making an amphibious assault that is preceded by a sea battle (see Amphibious Assaults), as they must unload after the sea battle is successfully completed. You cannot move additional units into an embattled space once an attack has begun.

 

A land or sea unit can move a number of spaces up to its move value. Most units must stop when they enter a hostile space. Thus, a unit with a move value of 2 could move into a friendly space and then a hostile space, or just into a hostile space.

 

An enemy submarine does not block any of your units’ movement, nor does it prevent loading or offloading in that sea zone. As the moving player, you have the option of attacking an enemy submarine that shares a sea zone with you. However, if a warship chooses to attack a submarine, that warship must end its movement in that sea zone.

 

Sea Units Starting in Hostile Sea Zones

At the beginning of the Combat Move phase, you may already have sea units in spaces containing enemy units that were there at the start of your turn. For example, an enemy may have built new sea units in a sea zone where you have surface warships. When your turn comes around again, you are sharing that sea zone with enemy forces.

 

If you are sharing a sea zone with enemy surface warships (not submarines), this situation requires you to do one of the following:

 

- Remain in the sea zone and conduct combat,

- Leave the sea zone, load units if desired, and conduct

combat elsewhere,

- Leave the sea zone, load units, and return to the same sea

zone to conduct combat (you cannot load units while in a

hostile sea zone), or

- Leave the sea zone and conduct no combat.

 

Once these sea units have moved and/or participated in combat, they cannot move or participate in the Noncombat Move phase of the turn.

 

Air Units

An air unit that moves in the Combat Move phase must generally reserve part of its move value for the Noncombat Move phase, at which point it must return to a safe landing spot using its remaining movement.

 

An air unit’s movement in any complete turn is limited to its total move value. Thus, a strategic bomber with a move value of 10 cannot move ten spaces to get to a hostile space. It must save enough movement points to get to a friendly territory where it can land. A fighter or helicopter can move its full four spaces to attack in a sea zone instead of saving movement, but only if a carrier could be there for it to land on by the conclusion of the Mobilize New Units phase.

 

Air units attacking territories that have antiaircraft guns will be fired upon. This does not include territories containing antiaircraft guns that are only being flown over. Normal antiaircraft guns cannot fire upon strategic bombers conducting bombing raids. These air units are fired on by antiaircraft cover provided by the industrial complex air base or naval base that is being attacked.

 

Amphibious Assaults

If you want to make any amphibious assaults, announce your intent to do so during the Combat Move phase. An amphibious assault takes place when you attack a coastal territory or island group from a non-hostile sea zone by offloading land units from amphibious assault ships into that target territory (or make a joint attack with both seaborne units that are offloading and other units from one or more neighbouring territories).

 

Moving amphibious assault ships and their cargo into a sea zone from which you plan to make an amphibious assault counts as a combat move, even if there are no defending surface warships or scrambled air units there. This is also true of any cruisers and/or destroyers that will support the assault.

 

During the Conduct Combat phase, you can only launch amphibious assaults that you announced during this phase.

 

If an amphibious assault involves a sea combat, any air units participating in the assault must move to either the sea zone or the land territory. They will then participate only in the part of the assault to which they have moved.

 

Special Combat Movement

 

A number of units can make special moves during this phase. These are described in detail below.

 

Aircraft Carriers

Any fighters or helicopter on an aircraft carrier launch before the carrier moves and move independently of the carrier. These air units can make a combat move from the carrier’s sea zone, or they can remain in the sea zone until the Noncombat Move phase.

 

Guest aircraft belonging to a friendly power on board another power’s carrier must remain on board as cargo if the carrier moves in combat. They cannot take part in combat and are destroyed if the carrier is destroyed.

 

Whether it moves during the Combat Move or Noncombat Move phase, an aircraft carrier allows friendly fighters and helicopter to land on it in the sea zone where it finishes its move.

 

Submarines

Submarines are capable of moving undetected due to their ability to submerge. For this reason, they have special movement rules. If there are no enemy frigates present, a submarine can move through a sea zone containing enemy warships without stopping. However, if a submarine enters a sea zone containing an enemy frigate during the Combat Move phase, its movement ends immediately and combat will result.

 

Tanks, Mechanized Infantry (APC), Light Armored Vehicle (LAV) and Blitzing

A tank can “blitz” by moving through an unoccupied hostile territory as the first part of a move that can end in a friendly or hostile territory. In addition, one mechanized infantry and/or light armoured vehicle unit can move along with each blitzing tank. The complete move must occur during the Combat Move phase. The blitzing units establish control of the first territory before they move to the next. Place your control marker on the first territory and adjust the national production levels as you blitz. A blitzing tank (and mechanized infantry and/or light armoured vehicle) that encounters enemy units, including an antiaircraft gun, industrial complex, airbase, or naval base in the first territory it enters must stop there.

 

Amphibious Assault Ships

If an amphibious assault ship encounters hostile surface warships (not enemy submarines) AFTER it begins to move (not counting the sea zone it started in), its movement for that turn ends, and it must stop there and conduct sea combat.

 

An amphibious assault ship can load units while in any friendly sea zone along its route, including the sea zone it started in. If an amphibious assault ship loads land units during the Combat Move phase, it must offload those units to attack a hostile territory as part of an amphibious assault during the Conduct Combat phase, or it must retreat during the sea combat step of the amphibious assault sequence while attempting to do so. An amphibious assault ship that is part of an amphibious assault must end its movement in a friendly sea zone (or one that could become friendly as result of sea combat) from which it can conduct the assault.

 

Any land units aboard an amphibious assault ship are considered cargo until they offload. Cargo cannot take part in sea combat and is destroyed if the amphibious assault ship is destroyed.

 

Airbases (Combat ready)

When taking off from a territory or island that has a combat ready airbase, air units gain one additional movement point. Helicopter can now move 5 spaces, fighters can move 7 spaces and strategic bombers can move 11 spaces (see Airbases).

 

Naval Bases (Combat ready)

All ships beginning their movement from a sea zone serviced by an operative friendly naval base can move one additional movement point (see Naval bases).

 

Phase 4: Conduct Combat (Powers at War Only)

 

In this phase, you conduct combat against opposing units using the following sequence:

 

Combat Sequence

 

  1. Strategic bombing raids
  2. Amphibious assaults
  3. General combat

 

A number of units have special rules that modify or overwrite the combat rules in this section. See Unit Profiles, for combat rules associated with each type of unit.

 

At no time can an Allies power attack another Allies power.

 

There are two special actions that can take place at the beginning of this phase. Both actions involve defending air units reacting to enemy movements. These actions must be completed before any combat occurs.

 

Scramble: Defending fighters (strategic bombers cannot scramble) located on islands that have operative airbases can be scrambled to defend against attacks in the sea zones surrounding those islands. These air units can join other friendly units in the sea zone or be the only friendly units there. In either case, combat will be resolved as usual during the Conduct Combat phase.

 

Scrambled fighters are considered to be defending and players should refer to their defense combat factors and abilities when resolving combat. They cannot participate in any other battles during that turn, including a battle on the island from which they were scrambled.

 

All scrambled air units must return to the island from which they were scrambled. If the enemy captures that island, the units can move one space to land in a friendly territory or on a friendly aircraft carrier. If no such landing space is available, the units are lost. Surviving scrambled air units are landed during that turn’s Noncombat Move phase, before the attacker makes any movements.

 

Strategic Bombing Raids

A strategic bombing raid is a direct attack on a facility. During this step, you can bomb enemy industrial complexes, airbases, and naval bases with your strategic bombers. When you damage these facilities, their capabilities are decreased or eliminated, and your enemy must spend IPCs to repair them in order to restore those capabilities. These repairs will be made by the units’ controlling player during his or her Purchase & Repair Units phase (see Purchase and Repair Units).

 

To conduct a strategic bombing raid, the attacking player moves his or her bombers to the targeted territory on the map. Fighters can also participate in strategic bombing raids as escorts and interceptors. Escort fighters (those accompanying the attacking bombers) can escort and protect the bombers, and they can originate from any territory, range permitting. They cannot participate in any other battles during that turn, including a battle in the territory in which the bombing raid is occurring. This applies whether or not the defender commits any interceptors.

 

Any number of defending fighters based in a territory that is about to be strategically bombed can be committed to participate in the defense of that territory’s facilities. If the defender has elected to commit fighter interceptors, an air battle will be fought immediately before the strategic bombing raid is conducted. This air battle is resolved in the same way as a normal combat, with the following exceptions:

 

- The attacking bombers and fighter escorts and the defending fighter interceptors will be the only units participating in this special combat.

- The attacking strategic bombers will not fire in the battle, but they can be taken as casualties. Players select their own casualties based on the number of hits received during the air battle.

- The combat lasts for only one round.

- The fighters have an attack value of 1 and a defense value of 2.

 

After the air battle is complete, or if there were no defending fighter interceptors, any surviving attacking bombers, along with their escorts, carry out the bombing raid. If the territory offers more than one target, the bombers are divided into groups, and each is assigned a specific target. At this point, fighter escorts are considered to be retreated. They do not participate in the actual bombing raid, and will remain in the territory until the Noncombat Move phase.

 

Each industrial complex, airbase, and naval base has its own antiaircraft system. If there is an antiaircraft gun in the targeted territory, do not roll for it. Those antiaircraft guns are used to protect military units. Each complex and base rolls one die against each bomber directly attacking it (not fighter escorts). For each “1” rolled, a bomber is immediately removed.

 

After resolving any antiaircraft fire (see Antiaircraft Guns), surviving bombers each roll one die. To mark the damage done by the attacking bomber(s), place one ‘Red’ plastic chip marker under the targeted industrial complex or base per damage point rolled. An industrial complex cannot receive more than 20 total damage for major industrial complexes and more than 6 total damage for minor ones. Airbases

and naval bases cannot receive more than 6 total damage. Damage exceeding these limits is not applied.

 

A bomber that performed a strategic bombing raid cannot participate in any other combat this turn and must return to a friendly territory during the Noncombat Move phase.

 

Amphibious Assaults

During this step you will resolve each amphibious assault you announced during the Combat Move phase. If you did not announce an amphibious assault, go to General Combat (see General Combat)

 

Amphibious Assault Sequence

  1. Sea combat
  2. Cruiser & destroyer bombardment
  3. Land combat

 

Step 1. Sea Combat: If there are defending surface warships and/or scrambled air units, sea combat occurs. If there are only defending submarines, the attacker can choose to ignore those units or conduct sea combat.

 

If sea combat occurs, all attacking and defending sea units must participate in the battle. Conduct the sea combat using the rules for General Combat (see General Combat), then go to step 3 (land combat).

 

If no sea combat occurs, go to step 2 (bombardment).

 

Step 2. Cruiser & Destroyer Bombardment: If there was NOT a combat in the sea zone from which you are offloading units from amphibious assault ships, any accompanying cruisers and destroyers in that sea zone can conduct a one-time bombardment of one coastal territory or island group being attacked. The number of ships that can make bombardment attacks is limited to one ship per land unit being offloaded from the amphibious assault ships in that coastal territory. If more than one territory or island group is being assaulted and there are multiple cruisers and/or destroyers, each ship may support only one assault. However, the ships’ bombardment may be split in any way that the attacker chooses, so long as the number of ships supporting each assault does not exceed the number of seaborne land units in that assault. Choosing to destroy enemy submarines in step 1 (above), counts as a combat and prevents the cruiser and destroyer bombardment from taking place.

 

Roll one die for each cruiser and destroyer that can conduct bombardment. Cruisers hit on a die roll of “4” or less, and destroyers hit on a “3” or less. For each hit, the defender will move a defending unit behind the casualty strip. These casualties will be able to defend during the land combat step before they are eliminated.

 

Each cruiser or destroyer can only bombard one coastal territory per turn.

 

Step 3. Land Combat:If there was no sea battle or the sea zone has been cleared of all defending enemy units except submerged submarines, and the attacker still has land units committed to the coastal territory, move all attacking and defending units to the battle strip and conduct combat using the general combat rules (general combat rules). Remember to put casualties from bombardment (if any) behind the casualty strip.

Attacking land units can come from amphibious assault ships (seaborne), and they can come from neighboring territories that are adjacent to the attacked territory. Any land units offloading from a single amphibious assault ship can only be offloaded into a single hostile territory.

If no land units (carried as cargo) survived the sea combat, or if the attacking sea units withdrew from the sea combat, then any other units that were designated to participate in the land attack (including air units) must still conduct one round of land combat in a regular attack on the intended hostile territory before they can retreat.

 

If the attacker does not have any attacking land or air units left, the amphibious assault is over.

 

Keep the attacking overland units and seaborne land units separated on the battle strip. Attacking seaborne units cannot retreat. Attacking overland land units and air units can retreat (between rounds of combat). All attacking overland land units must retreat together as a group. They can only retreat to where at least one of them originated and must all retreat at the same time and to the same place. A retreat may happen at the conclusion of any round of combat.

 

Attacking air units, whether involved in the sea combat or the attack on the coastal territory, can retreat according to the attacker retreat rules (Condition B—Attacker Retreats). If there is a retreat, air units and overland units (if any) must retreat at the same time. Air units will land during the Noncombat Move phase.

 

Air Units:

Each attacking air unit can participate in the sea battle or the attack on the coastal territory; it cannot do both. The attacking player must declare which air units are involved in each part of the attack and cannot change their assignments later. Scrambled air units are placed after the amphibious assault is announced and attacking air units are assigned

to the sea battle or the coastal territory. At the end of the amphibious assault, all air units remain in place; they will land during the Noncombat Move phase.

 

Air units defending in a territory can only fight in that territory. They cannot participate in the sea combat. The exception to this rule is fighters that are defending on an island that has an operative airbase. Such air units can be scrambled to an adjacent sea zone where they participate in its defense. Strategic bombers cannot be scrambled.

 

General Combat

In this step, you resolve combat in each space that contains your units and enemy units. Combat is resolved by following the General Combat sequence (below). Combat in each space takes place at the same time, but each affected territory or sea zone is resolved separately and completely before resolving combat in the next contested space. The attacker decides the order of spaces in which each combat occurs. No new units can enter as reinforcements once combat has begun. Attacking and defending units in each space are considered to fire at the same time, but for ease of play you roll dice in sequence: attacker first, then defender.

 

General Combat Sequence

  1. Place units along the battle strip
  2. Submarine surprise strike or submerge

(sea battles only)

  1. Attacking units fire
  2. Defending units fire
  3. Remove defender’s casualties
  4. Press attack or retreat
  5. Conclude combat

 

Step 1. Place Units Along the Battle Strip

The battle strip has two sides, labeled “Attacker” and “Defender.” Place all of the attacking and defending land, sea, and/or air units from the battle onto their respective sides aligned with the numbered columns that contain those units’ names and silhouettes. Facilities do not participate in general combat, as they may only be attacked and damaged by strategic bombing raids. The number in a unit’s column identifies that unit’s attack or defense value. An attacking or defending unit must roll its column’s attack or defense value number or less in order to score a hit.

 

In a sea battle, place any cargo (whether your own units or an ally’s) beside the amphibious assault ship or on the aircraft carrier (guest air units) that is carrying it. Cargo does not roll attacks, nor can it take a hit. It is lost with the ship carrying it if that ship is destroyed.

 

If you are attacking in a sea zone that already contained friendly units, your ally’s units are not placed along the battle strip, but remain out of play for this turn.

 

Step 2. Submarine Surprise Strike or Submerge (Sea Battles Only)

This step is specific to attacking and defending submarines. Before the general sea battle takes place (steps 3–5), both attacking and defending submarines can choose to either make a Surprise Strike die roll or submerge. However, if the opposing side has a frigate in the battle, the attacking or defending submarines cannot submerge or make a Surprise Strike and combat proceeds normally with your submarines firing along with your other units in step 3 or 4.

 

Attacking or defending submarines that choose to submerge are removed from the battle strip and placed on the game board in the contested sea zone, removing them from the remaining battle sequences.

 

Note: Decisions on whether attacking and defending submarines will fire or submerge must be made before any dice are rolled. The attacking player decides first.

 

Each attacking submarine conducting a Surprise Strike attack rolls one die. Attacking submarines that roll a “2” or less score a ‘direct’ hit. After the attacking player has rolled for all attacking submarines, the defender chooses one sea unit (submarines cannot hit air units) for each hit scored and moves it behind the casualty strip. (Note: undamaged capital ships that are hit only once are not removed.)

 

Then each defending submarine conducting a Surprise Strike attack rolls one die. Defending submarines that roll a “1” score a ‘direct’ hit. After the defending player has rolled for all defending submarines, the attacker chooses one sea unit for each hit scored and removes it from play. (Note: undamaged capital ships that are hit only once are not removed.)

 

Note: In both cases, submerged submarines cannot be chosen as a casualty since they have been removed from the battle.

 

Once all attacking and defending submarines that conducted a Surprise Strike attack have fired, the casualties they have generated are removed from the game and this step (step 2) is over for this round of combat. As long as there are attacking and or defending submarines and no opposing frigates, this step is repeated during each round of combat. Any hits made during this step that do not destroy units (such as cruisers and carriers) remain in effect until they are repaired.

 

Step 3. Attacking Units Fire (Land and Sea Battles)

Roll one die for each attacking unit with an attack value that did not fire or submerge in step 2. Roll for units with the same attack value at the same time. For example, roll all units with an attack value of “3” at the same time. An attacking unit scores a hit if you roll its attack value or less. After the attacking player has rolled for all attacking units, the defender chooses one unit for each hit scored and moves it behind the casualty strip. All units behind the casualty strip will return fire in step 4.

 

Step 4. Defending Units Fire (Land and Sea Battles)

Defending units roll one die for each unit with a defense value, including units behind the casualty strip that did not fire or submerge in step 2. Roll for units with the same defense value at the same time. A defending unit scores a hit if you roll its defense value or less.

 

After the defending player has rolled for each defending unit with a defense value, the attacker chooses one unit for each hit scored and removes it from play.

 

Specific to Sea Battles: In both steps 3 and 4, submarines that fired in step 2 cannot fire again during the same combat round. If there is an enemy frigate in the battle, submarines fire in step 3 or 4 rather than step 2. Remember that in sea battles hits from air units cannot be assigned to submarines unless there is a frigate present that is friendly to the air units in the battle.

 

Step 5. Remove Defender’s Casualties (Land and Sea Battles)

Remove the defender’s units that are behind the casualty strip from play.

 

Step 6. Press Attack or Retreat

Combat rounds (steps 2–5) continue unless one of the following two conditions occurs (in this order):

 

Condition A—Attacker and /or Defender Loses All Units

Once all units that can either fire or retreat on one or both sides have been destroyed, the combat ends.

If a player has combat units remaining along the battle strip, that player wins the combat. Players that have units remaining along the battle strip return those units to the contested space on the game board.

 

Condition B—Attacker Retreats

The attacker (never the defender) can retreat during this step. Move all attacking land and sea units in that combat that are on the battle strip to a single adjacent friendly space from which at least one of the attacking land or sea units moved. In the case of sea units, that space must have been friendly at the start of the turn. All such units must retreat together to the same territory or sea zone, regardless of where they came from.

Retreating air units remain in the contested space temporarily. They complete their retreat movement during the Noncombat Move phase using the same rules as an air unit involved in a successful battle.

 

Step 7. Conclude Combat

If you win a combat as the attacker in a territory and you have one or more surviving land units there, you take control of it. Otherwise, it remains in the defender’s control. (If all units on both sides were destroyed, the territory remains in the defender’s control.) Sea units cannot take control of a territory; they must stay at sea.

 

Air units cannot capture a territory. If your attack force has only air units remaining, you cannot occupy the territory you attacked, even if there are no enemy units remaining. Air units must return to a friendly territory or carrier during the Noncombat Move phase. Until then, they stay at the space where they fought.

Remove surviving land units that are along the battle strip and place them in the newly conquered territory. Place your control marker on the territory and adjust the national production levels. Your national production increases by the value of the captured territory; the loser’s production decreases by the same amount.

 

Any antiaircraft gun, industrial complex, airbase, and/ or naval base located in the captured territory now is controlled by your side (see Liberating a Territory, below). If you capture an antiaircraft gun, you cannot move it in the Noncombat Move phase of the same turn. If you capture an industrial complex, you cannot mobilize new units there until your next turn. If you capture an airbase or naval base, you cannot use the added flight or sea movement or receive repairs until your next turn. Any damage previously inflicted on a facility remains in place until it is repaired.

 

Liberating a Territory

If you capture a territory that was originally controlled by another member of your side, you “liberate” the territory. You do not take control of it; instead, the original controller regains the territory and the national production level is adjusted. Any antiaircraft gun, industrial complex, airbase, and/or naval base in that territory revert to the original controller of the territory.

 

If the original controller’s (player whose territory you just liberated) capital is in enemy hands at the end of the turn in which you would otherwise have liberated the territory, you capture the territory, you adjust your national production level, and you can use any antiaircraft gun, industrial complex, airbase, and naval base there until the original controller’s capital is liberated. The liberating player cannot use these newly liberated facilities until the player’s next turn.

 

Capturing and Liberating Capitals

If a power captures a territory containing an enemy capital (East United States, United Kingdom for example), follow the same rules as for capturing a territory. Add the captured territory’s income value to your national production level.

 

In addition, you collect all unspent IPCs from the original controller of the captured capital. For example, if China conquers the United Kingdom while the British player is holding 8 IPCs, those IPCs are immediately transferred to China’s player. You collect these IPCs even if your own capital is in enemy hands.

 

When capturing a last remaining Opfor capital, signifying the Allied victory, you still add the captured territory’s income value to your national production level and you collect any unspent IPCs it may have. The Opfor player will have one more turn, using his or her existing forces to try to liberate that capital.

 

The original controller of the captured capital is still in the game but cannot collect income from any territories he or she still controls and cannot buy new units. The player skips all but the Combat Move, Conduct Combat, and Noncombat Move phases until the capital is liberated. If that power or one on its side liberates the capital, the original controller can once again collect income from territories he or she controls, including territories reverting control to him or her.

 

If a capital is liberated, the industrial complex and any antiaircraft guns, airbases, and naval bases in that capital territory revert ownership to the original controller of the capital. Other territories and industrial complexes, airbases, and naval bases that were originally controlled by the newly liberated capital’s controller but are currently in the hands of friendly powers also revert control. Antiaircraft guns

in reverting territories outside the newly liberated capital territory remain under their pre-liberation ownership.

 

You do not collect IPCs from the controlling power when you liberate a capital. For example, if NATO player takes the United Kingdom’s from China’s player, China’s player does not surrender any IPCs.

 

Capturing a Victory City

Opfor wins the game by capturing and controlling any 9 former Allies, pro-Allies or Neutral victory cities for a complete round of play, as long they control two out of the three Opfor capital cities Cairo, Moscow and/or Beijing.

Players should keep a close eye on Opfor’s progress and the number of victory cities of which it has control. If the Opfor player controls 9 victory cities for a complete round of play, he or she wins the war.

 

Multinational Forces

Units on the same side can share a territory or sea zone, constituting a multinational force. Such forces can defend together, but they cannot attack together. (This does not mean powers can share income: only the power that controls a territory collects income for that territory.)

 

A multinational force cannot attack the same space together. Any units in a sea zone in which a battle occurs that belong to an ally of the attacker (other than cargo on an attacker’s ship) cannot participate in the battle in any way. Such units cannot be taken as losses in the sea combat and have no effect on defending submarines. Each attacking power moves and fires its own units on its own turn.

 

An attacking fighter or helicopter can launch from an aircraft carrier owned by an ally, but the ally’s carrier cannot move until its controller’s turn. Similarly, an attacking carrier can carry an ally’s fighter or helicopter as cargo, but the ally’s air unit cannot participate in an attack by that carrier.

 

An attacking land unit can assault a coastal territory from an ally’s amphibious assault ship, but only on the attacking land unit owner’s turn.

 

Multinational Defense: When a space containing a multinational force is attacked, all its units defend together. If the defending units belong to powers under the control of different players, those players mutually determine the casualties. If they cannot agree, the attacker chooses.

 

Transporting Multinational Forces: Amphibious assault ship belonging to a friendly power can load and offload your land units. This is a three-step process:

  1. You load your land units aboard the friendly amphibious assault ship on your turn.
  2. The amphibious assault ship’s controller moves it (or not) on that player’s turn.
  3. You offload your land units on your next turn.

 

Phase 5: Noncombat Move

 

In this phase, you can move any of your units that did not move in the Combat Move phase or participate in combat during your turn. You will also land all your air units that participated in and survived the Conduct Combat phase. This is a good time to gather your units, either to fortify vulnerable territories or to reinforce units at the front.

 

Only air units and submarines can move through hostile spaces during this phase.

 

Stranded defending air units also land during this phase. These are carrier air units whose aircraft carrier has been damaged or destroyed in combat or scrambled air units or fighter interceptors (see Conduct Combat) whose original territory is now under enemy control. These units are allowed movement of up to one space to find a friendly territory or carrier on which to land. If no landing space can be found, they are lost. This movement occurs before the acting player makes any noncombat movements.

 

Where Units Can Move

Land Units: A land unit can move into any friendly territory, including territories that were captured in the current turn. It cannot move into a hostile territory (not even one that contains no combat units but is enemy-controlled). Note, this is the only phase in which antiaircraft guns can move.

 

Air Units: An air unit must end its move in an eligible landing space. Air units can land in any territory that was friendly at the start of your turn.

Only fighters and helicopter can land in a sea zone with a friendly carrier present. A landing spot must be available on the carrier. Additionally:

 

- A fighter or helicopter can land in a sea zone (even a hostile one) that is adjacent to an industrial complex you own if you will be mobilizing an aircraft carrier that you previously purchased in that zone during the Mobilize New Units phase.

 

- In order for a fighter or helicopter to land on a carrier, both units must END their movement in the same sea zone.

 

- You must have a carrier move, remain in place, or be mobilized (new carriers only) to pick up a fighter or helicopter that would end its noncombat movement in a sea zone. You cannot deliberately move an air unit out of range of a potential safe landing space.

 

Air units that cannot move to an eligible landing space by the end of the Noncombat Move phase are destroyed. This includes stranded defending air units (see above).

 

No air units can land in any territory that was hostile at the start of your turn, including any territory that was just captured by you this turn.

 

Sea Units: A sea unit can move through any friendly sea zone. It cannot move into or through a hostile sea zone.

 

Unlike other sea units, submarines can move through and even into hostile sea zones in the Noncombat Move phase. However, a submarine must end its movement when it enters a sea zone containing one or more enemy frigates.

 

Amphibious assault ship can move to friendly coastal territories and load or offload cargo, unless they loaded, moved, offloaded, or were involved in combat during the Combat Move or Conduct Combat phase.

 

Aircraft carriers can move to sea zones to allow friendly fighters and helicopter to land. They must move there, range permitting, if they did not move in the Combat Move phase and the friendly sea zone is the only valid landing zone for the air units. An aircraft carrier and a fighter or helicopter must both end their moves in the same sea zone in order for the air unit to land on the carrier.

 

Phase 6: Mobilize New Units

 

Move the newly purchased (and or activated units in for example former (friendly) neutral territories) from the mobilization zone on the game board to eligible spaces you have controlled since the start of your turn. You cannot use industrial complexes that you captured or purchased this turn. You can never use an industrial complex owned by a friendly power.

 

The number of units that can be produced by each industrial complex each turn is limited to 10 for major industrial complexes and 3 for minor ones. For each damage marker (‘Red’ plastic chip marker) that is under a given industrial complex, one less unit can be mobilized by that factory. Industrial complexes are never destroyed. They can be heavily damaged, however, and can be damaged to the point where they have at least as many damage markers as they have production ability. In this case, no new units can enter the game through that factory until it is repaired.

 

Restrictions on Placement

You can place land units and strategic bombers only in territories containing eligible industrial complexes. Land units cannot enter play on transports.

 

You can place sea units only in sea zones adjacent to territories containing eligible industrial complexes. New sea units can enter play even in a hostile sea zone. No combat occurs because the Conduct Combat phase

is over.

 

You can place fighters and helicopter into territories containing an industrial complex controlled by your power from the start of your turn, or on an aircraft carrier owned by your power in a sea zone (even a hostile one) adjacent to a territory with such an industrial complex. The aircraft carrier can be either a new one currently being mobilized, or an existing one already in place. You cannot place a new fighter or helicopter on a carrier owned by a friendly power.

 

Place new industrial complexes in any territory that you have controlled since the start of your turn. Major industrial complexes can only be built on territories with an IPC value of 3 or higher. Minor industrial complexes can only be built on territories with an IPC value of 2 or higher. You cannot have more than one industrial complex per territory. Industrial complexes cannot be built on islands.

 

Phase 7: Collect Income

 

In this phase, you earn production income to finance future attacks and strategies. Look up your power’s national production level (indicated by your control marker) on the national production chart and collect that number of IPCs from the bank (recorded by the banker). This is the amount of IPC income you have generated. In addition, you may have reached your national objectives.

If your capital is under an enemy power’s control, you cannot collect income. A power cannot lend or give IPCs to another power, even if both powers are on the same side.

 

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